DOCUMENT: Crime

Idiot Okie Stars In Viral Road Rage Video

Ex-convict, 60, is facing felony charge

SEPTEMBER 15--The pot-bellied, knife-wielding buffoon who stars in the latest road rage video to sweep the Internet is a convicted felon who served prison time for assaulting a police officer and who has been the subject of more than a dozen protective order applications accusing him of stalking and domestic violence, records show.

Paul Wiseley, 60, and his cohorts faced off Sunday afternoon against a group of motorcycle-riding Oklahoma State University students on a rural road in Pawnee County (which is outside Tulsa).

As seen in the below video, as a pal batters a prone student, Wiseley emerges from his Ford F-150 and begins issuing threats. Wearing a cutoff denim shirt, blue basketball shorts, and flip flops, Wiseley demands that an overalls-clad associate hand over the shotgun he was carrying. “I’ll blow your fucking face off,” Wiseley screams.

As he advances on one of the students, Wiseley lifts his shirt to reveal a large tattoo across his sprawling belly. Pointing to the ink, he yells, “I’m the real deal, bitch!” He is later heard warning, “I’ll kill you” and “I’ll cut your fucking throat.” At one point in the video, Wiseley is seen holding a small knife in his right hand.

During the melee, Wiseley took a GoPro camera from one of the students and refused to return it. “It’s the price you pay for fucking doing the wrong thing,” he explained.

Before driving his truck away, Wiseley told a group of students, “I hope none of you plan on pursuing this...with the law.” He added, “Enjoy yourself. I pray for everybody.”

The incident came to the attention of law enforcement when the video began circulating online earlier this week. As a result, Wiseley was arrested for assault with a deadly weapon, a felony. A student has told police that Wiseley--now free on $100,000 bond--held a knife to his throat during the altercation.

Oklahoma court records show that Wiseley’s rap sheet includes convictions for drunk driving, public intoxication, driving without a license, violating a protective order, breach of peace, malicious injury, and assault and battery on a police officer. He was sentenced to five years in state prison on the battery charge, but served 15 months in custody, according to Oklahoma Department of Corrections records.

Wiseley has also been the defendant in numerous court actions seeking orders of protection against him. The filings--made in five separate Oklahoma counties--have resulted in the issuance of multiple emergency orders of protection. The plaintiffs in these actions include 12 separate women. 

In a typical petition for a protective order against Wiseley, a woman accused him of bombarding her with phone calls and text messages, driving past her home late at night, and “Calling friends and family to inquire about my whereabouts.” In her court petition, the woman wrote, “I have repeatedly asked Paul to leave me alone. We had been in a platonic friendship.” A judge subsequently issued an order barring Wiseley from having any contact with the woman for three years.